ACTIVE KIDS ARE LESS LIKELY TO BE OVERWEIGHT OR OBESE

As Harvard University proclaims, obesity results from energy imbalance: too many calories in, too few calories burned. A number of factors influence how many calories (or how much “energy”) people burn each day, among them, age, body size, and genes. But the most variable factor-and the most easily modified-is the amount of activity people get each day.

Keeping active can help people stay at a healthy weight or lose weight. It can also lower the risk of heart disease, diabetes, stroke, high blood pressure, osteoporosis, and certain cancers, as well as reduce stress and boost mood. Inactive (sedentary) lifestyles do just the opposite.

Reducing childhood obesity is one of the top priorities in America right now. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), over 19% of children and adolescents between the ages of 2 and 19 are obese. That equates to over 14 million kids in total, or 1 in every 5 individuals within that age range.

Diet and lifestyle both play a big role in helping to reduce childhood obesity, but there’s one Miracle Drug that is the best way to reduce and prevent childhood obesity: physical activity. 

At the University of Michigan, they have found exercise helps curbs obesity. "Among the many things that years of teaching elementary school students has taught Cesar Reyes, is that kids sit too much during school and should move more.

The program, called InPACT (Interrupting Prolonged sitting with ACTivity), incorporates five bursts of moderate-to-high-intensity exercise into the class day, for a total of 20 minutes. It’s led by Rebecca Hasson, U-M associate professor of kinesiology and nutritional sciences, and was developed with the U-M schools of public health, education, and architecture and urban planning, and Project Healthy Schools.

Hasson is director of the Childhood Health Disparities Research Laboratory, and much of her research focuses on finding ways to incorporate exercise into children’s lives to curb the growing pediatric obesity epidemic. The lab’s research showed that uninterrupted prolonged sitting is associated with increased disruptive behavior and lower academic achievement in addition to increased obesity risk."

      

SEE ALL THE TREMENDOUS BENEFITS OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY HERE